Western Thirumanam Song Selections

Hey all,

Hope you are well.

I am just about recovering from being quite ill for the past few days, but I have not forgotten the promise I made you all.

Many praised my track selections for the Western Thirumanam fashion show, for which I choreographed. I promised to give you the list of the tracks so here goes. All the tracks (a couple of which were selected by the Western Thirumanam team) are in no particular order. I have attached the youtube links as well.

Hope you find it useful.

• VGo Silsila Yeh Chahat – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvocbGud808
• Kadhal Yogi – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_wqHsSIyKg
• VGo Albela Sajan – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoA56k2k1Wo
• Yevvana – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt8V7WlJnHg
• GrooveDEV Chaiya Chaiya – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrQD8Tf4ZA
• Dr Srimix Mere Samne Yaarumilla – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqj6ri9Ll0Q
• VGo Aayat – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxm439etfDk
• Shadow Entertainment Mudhalvane – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Csay8HzFk9I
• Dr Srimix Ancient Indian Summer – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9R8zIbgnAw
• Mental Manathil (female) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nx_OQUkjsHM
• Uyire – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE5SLY5tKEc
• Kaal Mulaitha Poove – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcdbM-lgTOs
• Dr Srimix All the way up – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wq0DtYDg_c
• Sketch Theme (Promo) song – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiMUX8_Qbks
• Pothai Nirathai Thaa – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMxTPmNaFqM
• Zack Knight Bom Diggy – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEgTtQFMjWw
• Lovely – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HT7g_9eNnYk
• VGo En Veetu Broccoli – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H65nitaREbY
• Vidya Vox Tamil Born Killa – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prpFIbl2ZQo
• Ladio – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrZ0rZjtm-4
• Anbil Avan – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5uSwo-gwok
• Ammaye Sannaga – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHGISypQnYQ
• Benny Dayal Tamil Fever – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVYQOW2CIDw
• Bairavaa BGM – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5BuFUIohHM

Enjoy listening and dancing away folks!!

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‘You are so pretty, you can become an actress’

Recently on Instagram, whilst I was browsing through my explore page, I came across a beautiful picture of a girl. Honestly, she was breath-taking and in my opinion drop dead gorgeous. What, however, concerned me massively and drove me to write this blog was one of the comments which were left on this photo – ‘you can become an actress’. For you information, the girl in the picture is not an actress and has no background in the field of drama.

I do not have much experience in the field of drama however I did complete a GCSE in Drama, and of the 13 GCSEs I sat, Drama was the one which challenged me the most. My two assessed pieces tested me in different ways. One was a play in which I had to play a 30 year old who was playing an 8 year old; basically it was a play within a play, so I had two folds of characterisations that I had to master. The second was where I had to play a teenage girl with Body Dysmorphic Disorder and how this condition escalated to psychosis which ultimately tipped her off the edge.

In addition to my own drama experience, one of my friends is a final year drama student at university and her aim is to eventually become a professional actress. I thought it would be useful for you to see how much it takes to build an acting career, whether it be part-time or full-time. She described to me how competitive the industry is and her plans for the next few years is to go to a drama school or do a Masters in Acting or get an internship somewhere, but go to acting classes on the side to hone her acting skills. She is not even sure whether she will definitely get into drama school, and on top of that she needs to get signed by an agency. It is then through her agent that she can get actual auditions and castings. This is just a summary of what she needs to achieve in the next few years in order to get one step closer to becoming an actress.

So why am I telling you all of this? Well because acting is extremely hard. Calling oneself an actor/actress is not something which happens overnight, it happens with years of training and hard work, just as with any performance art like dance or music.

Now if I talk more specifically about the South Asian film Industry, acting has become so much about girls in particular being eye-candy. This explains why the general public are also of the opinion that the Indian film industry requires good looks more than good acting skills. I personally feel it is absolutely disgusting that women are objectified to such an extent.

There are so many people at fault for the state of the Indian Film Industry, and I am not here to discuss these wider issues. All I want to say is that it is such a shame that so many individuals in westernised cultures are also falling victim to this objectification of actors and actresses (more so actresses of course).

I wanted to leave every girl and guy who aspires to be an actress or actor with one challenge. The day you strip of all your make up and style, and convince an audience that you can play characters ranging from 8 year olds all the way to 80 year olds, is when you really start showcasing your potential to act. 80% of your ability to pull off a character comes from your ability to act. The remaining 20% comes from additional factors such as: make-up, lighting, set design, camera angles, etc.

Next time you call yourself an actress or actor, really think about whether you are an actress/actor or whether you just have a passion for acting. They are two very different things!

Oh and for the general public, because I think we are all responsible for the state of the Indian film industry objectifying people, we need to stop falling victim to such daft mind-sets which are infecting the generations to come and their perception of an acting career, which I highly respect if done correctly.

Music has no language

Those who know me will be aware that I am a massive fan of Indian music, whether it be Tamil, Telugu, Hindi, Malayalam, or Punjabi, to name a few. Those who know me very well will know that AR Rahman is my favourite music director to date.

I was born in a decade when AR Rahman’s music was (and still is to be honest) reigning the Indian music charts – I was born in 1993, if anyone was curious.

Growing up as a toddler listening to songs from Duet, Jeans, Love Birds and Muthu for example, had a massive influence on shaping my taste in music. Growing up being exposed to multiple cultures and languages at school, and appreciating AR Rahman’s top notch work regardless of which state or country he produced for, made me appreciate music from different cultures that much more.

I am saying all of this because the AR Rahman concert which happened in July, in London, caused a lot of tension amongst the audience, and especially the non-Tamil audience, because apparently not enough Hindi songs were played. I was not present at the concert in July because of other commitments, so I am just stating what I heard and saw across social media.

What I wanted to discuss in this blog, however, was the fact that recently AR Rahman announced the dates for his concert in Canada in October. What I found shocking was that he will be hosting two separate concerts, one for Hindi music and another for Hindi music.

We can take this positively. AR Rahman has created so much music in both languages and it can be difficult to cover the best of both in one concert; so this separation might be good. However I see more issues than positives here.
Before you start thinking why I am writing about this, I realised there being an issue when I saw the responses on social media in response to this announcement of two concerts.

The one quality about AR Rahman is that he has been able to create music and touch the hearts of several cultural groups. To have all those cultural groups under one roof in the name of music is what music should be about. Creating a divide between Tamil and Hindi music puts several people in limbo: what about Tamils who enjoy his Hindi music and want to hear that, or vice versa? What about people from other cultural groups who love AR Rahman for both his Tamil and Hindi music and wanted to hear both (and seriously what are the chances that such individuals will buy tickets for both days)? Basically, by getting such individuals to choose between Tamil and Hindi, more of a rift is being created. Is this something that real music-lovers would want?

No one knows the reasons behind why such a decision was taken. If in the slightest, however, AR Rahman’s Netru Indru Naalai concert in London had a role to play in this separation, then we all should be worried. Why? Because we should be working towards breaking down cultural boundaries and inter-cultural barriers. Just when I thought we were taking a step in the right direction, we are taking two steps backwards.